Product teams own capabilities, not (only) code.

As a software engineer, what is your job? and what is your value? On many teams, the work is “add features to this codebase.” We congratulate teams for moving JIRA tickets from “defined” to “delivered.” Meanwhile, the value to the business depends on value to the customers, or to people or software who in turn …

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What is this “product” you speak of?

We talk about “software products” and “product teams.” What does this even mean, “product?” It is not the definition I learned in school. Economics 101: the output of the economy is “goods and services.” Goods, also called “products,” are physical items that you can buy, take home, and have. Like, if you buy a rug, …

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Project to Product asks more of our software, and more of us

TL;DR: Projects ask teams do what is asked of them; Products ask teams to invent their work. This requires a different way of seeing the world, and not everyone can do it yet. Software is not an up-front investment that pays off over its use. Software is an ongoing concern, an intricate piece of a …

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Increasing potential as a specific output of flow

In Projects to Products, Mik Kersten divides flow items in software products in four: features, defects, risks, and debt. If you only count features added and bugs fixed – changes visible externally – then you neglect the other outcome of our work: the next version of the team+software. I prefer to think of “technical debt” …

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